Author: admin

Google AdWords Conversion Tracking Explained

Google Adwords conversion tracking is vital because it’s the most important collection of information needed for improving your AdWords account. Adwords conversion tracking records how many conversions your site has received in total, the specific keywords that are converting, and the specific ad copy that is converting. When armed with conversion tracking data, you can improve the efficiency of your campaigns, and drive more conversions at a lower cost. What is A Conversion? First of all, let’s discuss what qualifies as a “conversion”, because it can mean different things to different businesses. In general, conversions are any significant actions taken by visitors on your site after clicking on one of your ads. A conversion can be anything you define it to be, depending on what you want to track. As an advertiser, it is your job to first identify what are the significant actions that you want to track. For example, if you’re an e-commerce business you’ll likely want to track sales as conversions. If you’re a local business, you might want to track phone calls or contact form submissions. Generally speaking, anything that contributes towards driving business is worth tracking. We have found, through experience, that many businesses either aren’t using conversion tracking, or are not using it correctly. Too many times while conducting a Google AdWords audit, we have run into situations where businesses are tracking visits instead of conversions. For example, they may be tracking contact page visits rather than contact form submissions. A page visit is not a conversion until further action is taken by the visitor. Advertisers who are tracking the wrong data unfortunately don’t have an accurate record of what’s converting and what’s not. Why You Should Use Google AdWords Conversion Tracking When you have Google AdWords conversion tracking set up correctly, you can see which keywords are leading to the ads that are driving the most conversions. Then you can use that data to do more of what’s working, and filter out what’s not working. If your goal is to drive more phone calls, you can you use AdWords conversion tracking data to learn which keywords and ad copy...

9 Things To Look For When Hiring A Web Design & Development Agency

A website redesign is an extremely important initiative that requires a large investment of your firm’s time, money and resources—and should be approached strategically. Choosing a web agency for your firm to partner with on a website redesign is a critical decision; one that shouldn’t be made without the proper considerations. If you think about it, the development of a website is a unique marketing initiative that spans across many functions: strategy, planning, content, design, copywriting, photography, development, programming, SEO, video and possibly more. In other words, a website is more than just design and code—it’s purpose is to be a tool for marketing and business development. Developing the right kind of website requires the right kind of agency. Here are 9 things to look for and consider when hiring a web design and development agency: 1. A strategic process and approach Web development is a complex endeavour with many moving pieces, all with far-reaching and interconnected implications. As with any construction project, success requires the proper approach and a thorough and intentional process. When considering web agencies, be sure they can articulate a strategic process from start to finish. Ideally, it is one that has been refined by many years of “lessons learned” and continuously augmented for emerging best practices. Seek to understand their overall approach, how their process plays out, what takes place at each stage and what your involvement will be at each step. An agency’s process should give you a sense of confidence in their ability to deliver a successful project for your firm. 2. Impressive portfolio of custom web experience You’ll want to take a hard look at the portfolio of every potential web agency you consider and spend some time browsing websites they have produced. It starts with looking at style and design. Do you like what you see? Is their design striking and appealing to you or does it leave much to be desired? Are their websites custom, or do they simply use pre-built themes that they tailor for each client? But don’t just look at design, you’ll also want to consider other aspects such as user experience, functionality,...

Rio 2016’s logo is first Olympic branding to be 3D Modelled

Watching the Olympics, you may have noticed medalists standing on the podium holding a little object instead of the traditional floral bouquet. That trophy-like tchotchke is actually a sculpture of the official Rio Olympics logo, which also happens to be the first 3D logo in the history of the Games. Designed by Brazilian graphic designer Fred Gelli and his design studio Tátil after beating out nearly 140 competitors, the fluid, colorful logo shows three figures joining hands and feet à la Henri Matisse’s dancing ladies. Speaking at the Design Indaba conference earlier this year, Gelli said that design proposals were required to address 12 different aspects, from reflecting the host nation’s culture to being universally understood, and simultaneously be "printed on a pen" and "dress the whole city." It took Gelli and his team 50 versions before settling on the final logo, which was produced as a 3D model and incorporates the curves of Sugarloaf Mountain. (The team also created the logo for the Paralympics.) When viewed in the original digital scheme, the image can be rotated, as if the figures are spinning in a circle. 3D modeling also allows for it to be rendered as a physical object, which is what we see Olympians clutching during the medal ceremony. As for the flowers? According to Thrillist, Rio officials decided that bouquets were not a sustainable option for the Games (though flowers are still included as stage decoration) and instead opted for a sculpture of the logo as a gift to winning athletes. This marks the first Olympics to get rid of bouquets....

typography

Why Should I Care about Typography Exactly?

Typography is something we see every day. On our phones, on the subway, in magazines, on websites, on T-shirts, and on billboards. We’ve become so accustomed to looking at beautifully-designed, coherent text over the years that we instantly recognize when something doesn’t work. Fonts can sometimes be like sports stars. No seriously, bear with us. They do their thing day in, day out and you simply expect them to work without a flaw. It’s only when we notice something bad or shocking, that we rip them to shreds and call them out on their wrongdoings. Makes sense right? In fact, Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert was famously ridiculed after he wrote a scathing open letter to NBA superstar Lebron James by using the world’s least favorite font: Comic Sans. Even though it’s just a design, this typographically naive choice took something serious and heartfelt and turned it into a laughing stock. Gilbert isn’t alone in his typography fail, major corporations and small businesses alike also don’t seem to challenge font choices before they reach the public eye. The ‘You had one job’ meme would have a field day with regards to some marketing execs. The internet is almost bursting with outrageous top 10 lists of typography fails; making it laughable to think that someone was paid to create these font fiascos when advertising a product or service. Type of font (Comic Sans, Papyrus, and Bleeding Cowboys seem to have the worst rep), spacing, and misuse of symbols—these are definitely all important to learn. In terms of websites, the importance of images is not to be forgotten, but as we’ve just seen, it’s incredibly easy to make one typography slip-up that can run a reputation off course. As a 1&1 article explains, fonts need to match the site’s theme and target group, and that unusual fonts can sometimes lead to annoyingly long loading times. It seems there’s far more to fonts than simply choosing one that looks cool. As the owner of a website, it may be that typography is at the bottom of your list of priorities. Interesting, relative content, striking headlines, strong images,...

digital marketing info

Some Eye-Opening Digital Marketing Info & Stats

The media world for months has been all Facebook, Donald Trump and ad blocking, so why would the past week in digital marketing be any different? Check out these eight data points that jumped off the page during the past several days. 1. If social is any indication, Hillary is in troubleAccording to analytics player 4C, the Republican primaries and Donald Trump's successful run at the nomination have garnered nearly 130 million social media engagements (likes, comments, replies, etc.) on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Meanwhile, during the same period of time, Jan. 1 through July 21, the Democrats—chiefly nominee Hillary Clinton and runner-up Bernie Sanders—have only generated 37 million engagements. 2. Men block adsAn IAB report said 26 percent of desktop users and 15 percent of mobile consumers employ ad blockers to zap promos from publishers' websites. Thirty-two percent of ad blockers are males between 18 and 34, and 22 percent are women of the same age. 3. Facebook Inc. commands the worldThere are supposedly 7.4 billion people on Earth. After Facebook Inc.'s earnings report on Wednesday, it became clear the company has attracted an unbelievable chunk of our possible, human audience. If you add up its four chief platforms—Facebook (1.7 billion monthly users), Messenger (1 billion), WhatsApp (1 billion) and Instagram (500 million)—they total 4.2 billion users. There's most likely a ton of overlap—between Facebook and Messenger, in particular—but the numbers are staggering, nonetheless. 4. With a grand audience comes grand revenuesAnd thanks to those huge stats, Facebook continues to make a load of money from advertising, bringing in $6.24 billion in ad sales during the second quarter. Eighty-four percent of that amount came from mobile ads, the social giant also said Wednesday in its earnings report. 5. UnFacebook-like growthTwitter's life on Wall Street has been considerably bumpier than Facebook's because the former is constantly compared—unfairly, perhaps—to the latter. According to Twitter's second-quarter earnings, its revenue totaled $602 million, a 20 percent year-over-year increase, but fell short of expectations ($607 million). Advertising revenue grew 18 percent to $535 million, with mobile now accounting for 89 percent of total ad revenue. The San...